Tag : lifestyle

banner

Manchester Science Festival to Feature Family Event on Ibn Al-Haytham

by 1001 Inventions Published on: 20th September 2018

1001 Inventions Celebrates Ibn Al-Haytham at Manchester’s Iconic Central Library

Banner

Embedding Scientific Ideas as a Mode of Science Transmission

by George Saliba Published on: 12th September 2018

I used the discipline of astronomy as a template to record the transmitted ideas and hoped that other people, who work on other disciplines, would do the same, all in an effort to paint a…

Constantine the African and the Qayrawani doctors: Contribution of the ‘Phoenicians’ of North Africa to Latin Medicine in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

by Charles Burnett Published on: 10th September 2018

When a sixteenth-century medical writer referred to Phoenicians, alongside Arabs, as exceptionally important medical sources, he was probably referring to the Muslim and Jewish doctors of Qayrawan, who were writing in Arabic in the tenth…

banner

Science in Adab Literature

by Paul Lettinck Published on: 7th September 2018

A long standing topic of discussion among orientalists has been the question whether science in medieval Islamic society was a marginal activity, restricted to small elite circles and not rooted in society, or whether it…

banner

Astronomy in Medieval Jerusalem

by David A King Published on: 1st February 2018

Various medieval Arabic manuscripts preserved in libraries around the world – Leipzig, Cairo, Princeton, and not least Jerusalem

banner

Arabic Medicinal Manuscripts of Pre-Colonial Northern Nigeria: A Descriptive List

by Mukhtar Umar Bunza Published on: 1st January 2018

West African Muslim scholars produced a number of Arabic works relating to medicine, philosophy, economic studies, political thought, geography, architecture, town planning and public administration...

banner

When the World was Upside Down: Maps from Muslim Civilisation

by Cem Nizamoglu Published on: 15th December 2017

Great scholars from Muslim Civilisation, indeed, turned the world upside down with their maps; not just metaphorically but world maps once were literally upside down (with south dipicted at the top).

banner

Marrakesh

by Salah Zaimeche Published on: 5th July 2017

It is highly crucial to begin this article by the following point which not many people are aware of, but is perhaps one of the most decisive moments in Muslim history: the role played by…

banner

An introduction to Early Islamic Society and Social Sciences

by Salah Zaimeche Published on: 28th June 2017

...in order to know or appreciate most developments of Muslim society and civilization, or to understand the very foundations of Islamic society and civilization, we have to go to the very early history of Islam.…

banner

Technology in sub-Saharan Cultures

by Khaleel Shaikh Published on: 5th June 2017

Genetic and paleontological findings have concluded that Africa is the birthplace of the entire human race. Africa is often thought of as a continent rich in natural beauty and culture. However, little is known or…

banner

Muslims Contribution to the Study and Development of Medical Sciences in 19th Century Nigeria: A Preliminary Account

by Mukhtar Umar Bunza Published on: 23rd May 2017

This paper presented at the 7th International Congress of the International Society of the History of Islamic Medicine, and 4th Fez Congress on History of Medicine, jointly organized by the University of Muhamed Ben Abdallah,…

banner

A Culture Devoted to Healing

by Glen M. Cooper Published on: 4th January 2017

Muslim Contributions to the Medical Sciences A Tribute to Dr Rabie E. Abdel-Halim

banner

The House of Wisdom: Baghdad’s Intellectual Powerhouse

by Cem Nizamoglu Published on: 17th May 2016

The heyday of Baghdad was 1,200 years ago when it was the thriving capital of the Muslim world. It was home to the House of Wisdom, an academy of knowledge that attracted brains from far…

banner

Song of Suwari: Ode to West African Scholars

by Natty Mark Samuels Published on: 3rd September 2015

Although some contemporary historians may argue otherwise, in the past, particularly in places such as West Africa, Muslims and non-Muslims lived together in relative harmony and prosperity. The positive impact of the spread of Islam…

banner

The European Jerusalem: Sarajevo, where Muslim heritage flourished in Central Europe

by Sairah Yassir-Deane Published on: 15th May 2014

During Ottoman rule, Sarajevo was heralded as the “European Jerusalem”, as its invaluable contributions to civil engineering, industry, trade and architecture attracted people from various ethnic and religious backgrounds. Aesthetic beauty alongside scientific ingenuity made,…

Banner

Inter-cultural Respect through Cultural Roots of Science

by Salim Al-Hassani Published on: 20th June 2012

The important lecture presented by Professor Salim Al-Hassani at the 15th Euro-Asian Economic Forum held in Istanbul and Izmir, Turkey in April 2012 addressed an assembly of eminent political representatives of fifty countries. His focus…

banner

Lady Montagu and the Introduction of Smallpox Inoculation to England

by Salah Zaimeche Published on: 16th February 2010

The English aristocrat and writer Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762) is today remembered particularly for her letters from Turkey, an early example of a secular work by a Western woman about the Muslim Orient. When…

banner

Ottoman Palace Cuisine of the Classical Period

by Arif Bilgin Published on: 9th April 2009

Turkish cuisine is largely the heritage of Ottoman cuisine, which can be described as a fusion and refinement of Central Asian, Middle Eastern and Balkan cuisines. Turkish cuisine also influenced these cuisines and other neighbouring…

banner

The Influence of Islamic Culinary Art on Europe

by Zohor Idrisi Published on: 16th May 2007

This paper describes the results of a novel research on the Muslim influence on the European culinary art during the Renaissance. Presenting evidence of how this influence entered the aristocratic circles in Europe, it draws…

banner

The World’s First Soft Drink

by Juliette Rossant Published on: 27th February 2006

Sherbet, a juice of crushed fruit, herbs, or flowers has long existed as one of the most popular beverages from and of the Muslim world, winning over Western figures such as Lord Byron. Today, this…

banner

Primary Schools under the Ottomans

by Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu Published on: 10th August 2005

Primary schools have a long history in Islamic civilisation. Children were taught to memorise the entire Qur'an usually at primary school for example. Here is a look at how the primary schools under the Ottomans…

Banner

12th Century Cookery from all the World

by Randah Kasmo Published on: 18th February 2005

This historical masterpiece on Arab/Islamic cooking by Kammaluddin Ibn Al-Adeem a famous historian, religious scholar, poet and calligrapher was written at the end of the 12th Century, and shows the rich culinary culture of Muslims…

banner

The Impact of Islam on Urban Development in North Africa

by Rabah Saoud Published on: 5th May 2004

This paper seeks to remind readers of the contribution of Islam to the civilisation of the peoples of North Africa by looking at its influence on the urbanisation of the region. The aim is to…

banner

Ottoman Educational Institutions during the Reform Period

by Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu Published on: 26th April 2004

The Imperial Tanzimat Rescript (Tanzimat Fermani) announced on 3 November 1839 provided state protection for basic rights and freedoms. Following this, programs of educational reform made the reorganization of secondary education a priority and the…

banner

Curricula in Ottoman Madrasas

by Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu Published on: 21st April 2004

It is possible to provide a basic (though only partial) outline of what was taught at Ottoman madrasas. Students would study from the books of (sarf), syntax (nahiv) and logic (mantik) and then hadith and…

banner

Ranking of the Ottoman Madrasas

by Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu Published on: 21st April 2004

Following the conquest of Istanbul, Mehmed the Conqueror initiated a campaign of construction. A new era in Ottoman education began with the establishment of the Fatih madrasas and the hierarchical structure of the madrasas was…

Banner

The Muslim Carpet

by Rabah Saoud Published on: 13th April 2004

The Muslim carpet has long been a luxury commodity sought by textile museums, rich collectors and wealthy merchants all over the world. The fame of the flying carpet of 'Al'a Al-Din (Aladdin) added some emotional…

banner

The Little Known Tolerant and Humane Side of Islamic Civilisation

by Salah Zaimeche Published on: 13th October 2003

...it can safely be said that no faith can show as equal sense of brotherhood between diverse colours as in Islam.

banner

Ziryab, the Musician, Astronomer, Fashion Designer and Gastronome

by The Editorial Team Published on: 13th June 2003

Abul-Hasan Alí Ibn Nafí, nicknamed Ziryab, was Chief Entertainer of the Court of Cordoba in 822AD. He revolutionised medieval music, lifestyle, fashion, hairstyles, furniture and even tableware. He transformed the way people ate, socialised, and…

banner

Muslim Contribution to Cosmetics

by The Editorial Team Published on: 20th May 2003

Al-Zahrawi's medical encyclopaedia, used in Europe's Universities from the 12th-17th century, discusses under-arm deodorants, hair removing sticks, hand lotions, hair dyes, hair care, suntan lotions, remedies for bad breath, nasal sprays and much more.

banner

Al-Qayrawan

by Salah Zaimeche Published on: 20th December 2002

Founded in 670 by Uqba bin Nafi, it was the seat of Arab governors in W Africa until 800. Under the Aghlabid dynasty (800-909), it remained the chief center of commerce and learning. It was…

banner

Figs in Muslim Spain

by Thomas F. Glick Published on: 21st July 2002

Figs may not have had the economic importance of olives, yet they afford an excellent example of the intensification of agriculture in Islamic Spain. This was manifest in the dazzling variety of the fruit available…

banner

Pottery, Ceramics and Glass

by Gaston Wiet Published on: 21st July 2002

As in all civilisations, great use was made of pottery, for cooking, lighting, washing, etc. In the bazaar in Cairo, grocers, druggists and ironmongers provided the glasses, the faience vessels and the paper to hold…

Al-Zahra – City of Andalus

by Rabah Saoud Published on: 13th January 2002

Al-Zahra became renowned for its high advanced civilisation, style and protocol in addition to the extensively decorated walls, floors and ceilings of its buildings. Venue for the legendary reception of King Ordono IV of Leon,…