Tag: Baghdad

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Women’s Contribution to Classical Islamic Civilisation: Science, Medicine and Politics

by Salim Al-Hassani Published on: 11th February 2020

While there are numerous works on the role of Muslim women in jurisprudence (fiqh) and literature, there are also studies on Muslim women in education and in medicine - although on a much smaller scale…

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Science Institutionalization in Early Islam

by Moneef Rafe Zoubi Published on: 29th January 2020

“Bayt al-Hikma of Baghdad as a Model of an Academy of Sciences” from Dirasat, Human and Social Sciences, Volume 44, No. 3, 2017: This study aims to introduce academy-type institutions of the pre-Islamic era. To…

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The House of Wisdom: Baghdad’s Intellectual Powerhouse

by Cem Nizamoglu Published on: 17th May 2016

The heyday of Baghdad was 1,200 years ago when it was the thriving capital of the Muslim world. It was home to the House of Wisdom, an academy of knowledge that attracted brains from far…

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Scholarly Traditions of the Schools in Baghdad: The Mustansiria as a Model

by Nabila A. Dawood Published on: 27th October 2015

Baghdad schools are a challenging topic, involving several different facets of history. These include cartography to identify the location of each school, biographical studies to identify their teachers, preachers, jurists and administrators, along with their…

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Malika I: Khayzuran & Zubayda

by Tom Verde Published on: 14th March 2015

From Indonesia to Pakistan, Kyrgyzstan to Nigeria, Senegal to Turkey, it is not particularly rare in our own times for women in Muslim-majority countries to be appointed and elected to high offices—including heads of state.…

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The renaissance of astronomy in Baghdad in the 9th and 10th centuries

by David A King Published on: 19th February 2015

[Note of the editor] This article was published in 2003 as: David A. King, "The renaissance of astronomy in Baghdad in the ninth and tenth centuries: A list of publications, mainly from the last 50…

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Abu al-Wafa al-Buzjanî

by The Editorial Team Published on: 8th July 2013

Muḥammad Abūʾl-Wafāʾ al-Būzjānī (10 June 940–997 or 998) was a distinguished Muslim astronomer and mathematician, who made important contributions to the development of trigonometry. He worked in a private observatory in Baghdad, where he made…

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Thabit ibn Qurra

by The Editorial Team Published on: 23rd February 2013

Abu al-Hasan Thabit ibn Qurra al-Harrani al-Sabi (born in Harran, now in southern Turkey, in 836 and died in Baghdad on 18 February 901) was a prolific scientist of the ninth century.

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A New Arabic Text of Mechanics: Sinan ibn Thabit on the Theory of Simple Machines

by Mohammed Abattouy Published on: 7th February 2012

The Arabic manuscript Orient fol. 3306 preserved at the Staatsbibliothek in Berlin was in its original form a precious collection of Arabic scientific texts of mechanics and optics. It contains a fragment in one folio…

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Muhammad Al-Karaji: A Mathematician Engineer from the Early 11th Century

by Mohammed Abattouy Published on: 4th June 2009

Abu Bakr Muhammed Al-Karaji is a Muslim mathematician and engineer from the late 10th century-early 11th century. Of Persian origin, he spent an important part of his scientific life in Baghdad where he composed ground…

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Science and Rationalism in 9th Century Baghdad

by Jim Al-Khalili Published on: 12th November 2008

Text of the Lecture of Professor Jim Al-Khalili in the Conference Muslim Heritage in our World: Social Cohesion marking the 1001 Inventions Exhibition at the House of Parliament, 15th of October 2008, Church House, London,…

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The Fate of Manuscripts in Iraq and Elsewhere

by Geoffrey Roper Published on: 11th September 2008

In this well informed article, Dr Geoffrey Roper, an expert in the field, outlines an impressive portrait of the dangers and threats encountered by the national heritage of Iraq due to the dramatic recent events…

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Ahmad Ibn Fadhlan in Northern Europe: A Survey of his Account of Russian Vikings in the 10th Century

by FSTC Published on: 3rd April 2008

One of the earliest detailed descriptions of Northern Europe is reported in the account written by the Arab Muslim writer and traveler Ahmad Ibn Fadhlan, who was sent in 921 CE as the secretary to…

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The Abbasids’ House of Wisdom in Baghdad

by Subhi Al-Azzawi Published on: 7th February 2007

The House of Wisdom was in fame, status, scope, size, resources, patronage, etc. similar to that of the present day British Library in London or the Nationale Bibliotheque in Paris, in addition to being an…

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Baghdad

by Salah Zaimeche Published on: 7th June 2005

The city of Baghdad was founded under the second Abbasid caliph Al-Mansur (ruled 754-775). After a lengthy research along the course of the Tigris as far north as Mosul, he decided to construct a palace…

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Ukhaidir Palace (720-800 CE)

by The Editorial Team Published on: 27th January 2005

About 100 miles south-west of Baghdad is Ukhaidar palace, one of the most preserved palaces of the Muslim world. It is unique in its architectural wealth and incorporated some of the key innovations that greatly…

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Ziryab, the Musician, Astronomer, Fashion Designer and Gastronome

by The Editorial Team Published on: 13th June 2003

Abul-Hasan Alí Ibn Nafí, nicknamed Ziryab, was Chief Entertainer of the Court of Cordoba in 822AD. He revolutionised medieval music, lifestyle, fashion, hairstyles, furniture and even tableware. He transformed the way people ate, socialised, and…

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The Great Book Collectors

by F.B. Artz Published on: 20th July 2002

The Muslims were great book collectors, and in all the larger towns there was a flourishing book trade. From Baghdad, to Cairo, to Cordoba and to Fez, Muslims built the libraries that housed the world…

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Abbasid Gardens in Baghdad and Samarra

by Qasim Al-Samarrai Published on: 11th July 2002

The love of gardens during the Abbâsid period, whether in Baghdad or in Samarra, was born within the already existing cultural tradition of Mesopotamia, where the art of gardening had been perfected many centuries before.

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City Design and Planning of the Abbassids

by Rabah Saoud Published on: 14th January 2002

The Abbassid period is characterised by large-scale design and city planning. In addition to their famous cities of Baghdad (762) and Samara (836), the Abbassids founded the settlement of Al-Rafiqa.

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Architecture under Abbassid Patronage (750-892)

by Rabah Saoud Published on: 14th January 2002

The Abbassids became patrons of a number of gigantic construction projects extending from large mosques and complex palaces to large-scale urban design and city planning, and consequently played a fundamental role in the city planning.