Tag : surgery

banner

Albucasis: A Landmark for Arabic and European Surgery

by Maria Do Sameiro Barroso Published on: 9th February 2017

This article presents Abu'l-Qasim Khalaf ibn 'Abbas al-Zaharawi, Arabic أبو القاسم خلف بن عباس الزهراوي, Latin Albucasis (936-1013 A.D.), one on the most outstanding Arabic physicians and the most remarkable Arabic surgeon. His work had…

banner

A Culture Devoted to Healing

by Glen M. Cooper Published on: 4th January 2017

Muslim Contributions to the Medical Sciences A Tribute to Dr Rabie E. Abdel-Halim

banner

The role of Ibn Sina (Avicenna)’s Medical Poem in the transmission of medical knowledge to medieval Europe

by Rabie Abdel-Halim Published on: 14th July 2014

Were you aware that in the Medieval Islamic world, celebrated scientists such as Ibn Sina used to relay their teachings through poetry? Poems structure and rhythm aided the process of transmitting and memorising scientific and…

banner

The Millennium Anniversary Of Abu al-Qasim al-Zahrawi

by Rabie Abdel-Halim Published on: 28th March 2014

In 2013, the world community of scholars celebrated a millennium after the death in 1013 of the renowned Andalusian physician- surgeon Abu al-Qasim al-Zahrawi (Abulcasis).

banner

Ibn Zuhr and the Progress of Surgery

by Published on: 5th December 2012

This study of the original Arabic edition of the book Al-Taysir fi ‘l-Mudawat wa’l-Tadbir (Book of Simplification Concerning Therapeutics and Diet) written by the Muslim physician Ibn Zuhr (Avenzoar, 1093-1162 CE) aims at evaluating his…

Caesarean Section in Early Islamic Literature

by Nasim Hasan Naqvi Published on: 20th December 2011

Some medical historians of the last century mistakenly recorded that Caesarean section was strictly forbidden amongst Muslims. This opinion has been repeatedly quoted without examining its authenticity or validity. Research into available ancient Arabic sources…

banner

Pioneer Physicians

by David W. Tschanz Published on: 21st February 2011

During the classical Muslim civilisation, big scientific advances in medicine were made. Muslim doctors began by collecting all the medical observations and theories of their predecessors, especially Hippocrates and Galen, and built an original and…

banner

The 15th Century Turkish Physician Serefeddin Sabuncuoglu Author of Cerrahiyetu ‘l-Haniyye

by Salim Ayduz Published on: 30th December 2010

The Turkish physician Serafeddin Sabuncuoglu (1385–1470) is the author of a famous treatise of surgery, Cerrahiyetü'l Haniyye (Imperial Surgery), composed in Turkish in 1465. It was the first illustrated surgical atlas and the last major…

banner

Circumcision Ceremonies at the Ottoman Palace

by Nil Sari Published on: 12th February 2009

Circumcision is widely practiced in all Islamic countries. Festivities pertaining to circumcision vary according to the regions and civilizations. In this report, circumcision festivities at the Ottoman Palace and the socioeconomic importance of the tradition…

banner

Islam’s Forgotten Contributions to Medical Science

by Ingrid Hehmeyer Published on: 9th January 2009

The transmission of medical knowledge can be traced to some of the earliest writings in human history. Yet a particularly fruitful period for advancement in medical science emerged with the rise of Islam. For the…

banner

Selected Gleanings from the History of Islamic Medicine

by Sharif Kaf al-Ghazal Published on: 3rd April 2007

The medical Islamic tradition is one of the richest and the most lasting components of the general history of medicine. Some of its main aspects are dealt with in a series of five articles by…

Banner

Ethical Aspects of Ottoman Surgical Practice

by Nil Sari Published on: 27th December 2006

Information about the requirements and expectations of medical ethics regarding surgery during the Ottoman period is found in medical manuscripts; while the moral principles based on Islamic Canon Law (Shari'ah) and the oral tradition (the…

banner

Bone Fractures in Ibn Sina’s Medicine

by Published on: 29th September 2005

Ibn Sina, or Avicenna as he referred to in the West, was a well-known philosopher and physician from Islamic civilisation. Here we look at his accomplishments and contributions towards knowledge of bone fractures.

banner

The Earliest Paediatric Surgical Atlas: Cerrahiye-i Ilhaniye

by S. N. Cenk Büyükünal Published on: 7th September 2005

The author of one of the earliest surgical books was Serafeddin Sabuncuoglu. In 1465, he wrote a surgical book in Turkish which contained not only pictures or miniatures of paediatric surgical procedures, but there were…

banner

Educating Ottoman Physicians

by Nil Sari Published on: 2nd September 2005

Medical doctors in the time of the Ottomans had various routes into professional life depending on their specialty. Some were trained on the model of master and apprentice, others studied courses at madrasas and at…

banner

The Impact of Translations of Muslim Sciences on the West

by Salah Zaimeche Published on: 4th March 2003

Scholars from all Christian lands rushed to translate Muslim science, and thus start the scientific awakening of Europe. Many of course were Spaniards: John of Seville, Hugh of Santalla, and those working under the patronage…

banner

Abu al-Qasim Al-Zahrawi the Great Surgeon

by Ibrahim Shaikh Published on: 22nd December 2001

Abu al-Qasim Khalaf ibn al-Abbas Al-Zahrawi (936-1013 CE), also known in the West as Albucasis, was an Andalusian physician. He is considered as the greatest surgeon in the Islamic medical tradition. His comprehensive medical texts,…