Tag: Literature

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Science in Adab Literature

by Paul Lettinck Published on: 7th September 2018

A long standing topic of discussion among orientalists has been the question whether science in medieval Islamic society was a marginal activity, restricted to small elite circles and not rooted in society, or whether it…

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Arab Origins of Cryptology

by Mohammed I. Al-Suwaiyel Published on: 14th May 2018

This article is the summary of a presentation given by Dr. Al-Suwaiyel at Oxford University. The presentation provides an insight into the works of Muslim Scholars on Cryptology in early Islamic periods.

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When the World was Upside Down: Maps from Muslim Civilisation

by Cem Nizamoglu Published on: 15th December 2017

Great scholars from Muslim Civilisation, indeed, turned the world upside down with their maps; not just metaphorically but world maps once were literally upside down (with south dipicted at the top).

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The West Owes a Debt to Islam: Interview with Prof Glen Cooper

by The Editorial Team Published on: 31st October 2017

Professor Glen Cooper discusses the Golden Age of Muslim Civilisation. During the European Dark Ages, when science, art and literature seemed to flounder for centuries, there actually was a lot of discover in places like…

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Manuscript Review: The Catalogue (Al Fihrist), by Al-Nadim

by N.A. Baloch Published on: 30th May 2017

AL-FIHRIST is to be regarded the first standard subject-wise 'catalogue' covering all areas of knowledge...

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Manuscript Review: The Law of Language, by Ibn Faris

by N.A. Baloch Published on: 18th April 2016

Ibn Faris was a poet of merit and could also write in fine prose style. He was grammarian, philologist and linguist...

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Ode to Ahmad Baba Al-Massufi

by Natty Mark Samuels Published on: 22nd May 2015

Abu al-Abbas Ahmad ibn Ahmad al-Takruri Al-Massufi al-Timbukti, otherwise commonly known as Ahmad Baba for short, was a well-known teacher, professor, philosopher, Arabic grammarian and an author of over forty books and various works.

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World Book Day 2015 (UK & Ireland)

by The Editorial Team Published on: 5th March 2015

World Book Day is a yearly event on 5th March, "designated by UNESCO as a worldwide celebration of books and reading, and marked in over 100 countries all over the world"*. On this occasion, we…

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The role of Ibn Sina (Avicenna)’s Medical Poem in the transmission of medical knowledge to medieval Europe

by Rabie Abdel-Halim Published on: 14th July 2014

Were you aware that in the Medieval Islamic world, celebrated scientists such as Ibn Sina used to relay their teachings through poetry? Poems structure and rhythm aided the process of transmitting and memorising scientific and…

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Professor Rabie E. Abdel-Halim’s Lectures

by The Editorial Team Published on: 13th December 2012

In 2012, FSTC members contributed to several activities by publishing articles and giving lectures all around the world. Professor Rabie E Abdel-Halim, member of Muslim Heritage Awareness Group (MHAG) and of FSTC Research Team, attended…

The Sound Rules in Reading the Quran (Tajwid) in Qutb Al-Din al-Shirazi’s Music Notation

The Sound Rules in Reading the Quran (Tajwid) in Qutb Al-Din al-Shirazi’s Music Notation

by Fazli Arslan Published on: 16th August 2011

In the Islamic world, starting from Al-Kindī (d. 874), Al-Fārābī (d. 950), Ibn Sīnā (d. 1034), and Safī al-Dīn al-Urmawī (d. 1294) used the abjad notation to write music. Of these writers, the most systematic…

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The Influence of Nasir al-Din al-Tusi on Ottoman Scientific Literature

by Salim Ayduz Published on: 29th June 2011

The works of Nasir al-Din al-Tusi have always attracted the interest of Ottoman scholars as early as the 14th century. Some of his works were translated into Turkish and various annotations or commentaries were written…

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Kalila wa-Dimna

by Paul Lunde Published on: 30th January 2011

One of the most popular books ever written is the book the Arabs know as Kalila wa-Dimna, a bestseller for almost two thousand years, and a book still read with pleasure all over the world.…

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Muslim Printing Before Gutenberg

by Geoffrey Roper Published on: 28th May 2008

Gutenberg in the 15th century. Based on his work on original sources, he states that some of the early printed Arabic documents display quite sophisticated designs involving calligraphic headpieces, transverse lettering, geometric panels, roundels, and…

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Mulla Nasruddin Khodja a Major Character of Muslim Satiric Literature

by The Editorial Team Published on: 11th January 2008

Mullah Nasruddin Khodja is a wise man famous throughout the Muslim and some parts of the non-Muslim world since the 16th century. Historical documents show that he lived in the 13th century in Anatolia (today…

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Knowledge, Learning Institutions and Libraries in Islam: Book Publishing and Paper Making

by The Editorial Team Published on: 1st November 2007

This short article describes the high regard with which Muslim Civilisation has held libraries as centres of knowledge. It reviews major contributions in the field and in particular to our modern books and libraries.

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Rediscovering Arabic Science: Islamic Scientific Heritage in the last issue of Saudi Aramco World

by Richard Covington Published on: 1st June 2007

In its current issue (May-June 2007), Saudi Aramco World, a magazine devoted to increase cross-cultural understanding published in Houston, Texas, dedicated a folder of 20 pages on Islamic science. The folder consists of three articles…

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Literature and Music in Muslim Civilisation

by The Editorial Team Published on: 11th April 2007

An outline of the main types of Arabic literature and their influence on European literature and a description of the main Arabic instruments and their subsequent development in Europe.

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The Balance: The Core Mental Model of the Islamic Science of Weights

by Mohammed Abattouy Published on: 17th November 2006

This article includes the recent work by Professor Abattouy and his co-workers. The work has revealed the enormous wealth of Islamic literature on the science of weights. Their findings established that there is much larger…

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The Earliest Paediatric Surgical Atlas: Cerrahiye-i Ilhaniye

by S. N. Cenk Büyükünal Published on: 7th September 2005

The author of one of the earliest surgical books was Serafeddin Sabuncuoglu. In 1465, he wrote a surgical book in Turkish which contained not only pictures or miniatures of paediatric surgical procedures, but there were…

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Basra

by FSTC Published on: 4th January 2005

Basra became like many places in the Muslim world a centre for knowledge and commerce. Originally set up on the orders of the Caliph as a military camp, the town had good fortunes but suffered…

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Ziryab, the Musician, Astronomer, Fashion Designer and Gastronome

by The Editorial Team Published on: 13th June 2003

Abul-Hasan Alí Ibn Nafí, nicknamed Ziryab, was Chief Entertainer of the Court of Cordoba in 822AD. He revolutionised medieval music, lifestyle, fashion, hairstyles, furniture and even tableware. He transformed the way people ate, socialised, and…

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The Impact of Islamic Learning: The spread of Arabic scientific literature to Europe

by Norman Daniel Published on: 21st July 2002

Paul Tannery said of geometry of the eleventh century in Europe: "This is not a chapter in the history of science; it is a study in ignorance." Its level, he said, was equivalent to that…

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The Islamic Historical Literature

by Salah Zaimeche Published on: 11th November 2001

The narration of historical events and the reflexion upon their causes are old scholarly concerns since ancient times. In Islamic culture, a specific Arabic historiographical tradition emerged very early, since the late 7th century, to…