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FSTC Activity Report 2015 / Newsletter
Year 2015 has been a busy, challenging and a successful Year.  FSTC wishes all our colleagues, supporters and readers a successful and prosperous Year 2016. We would like you to visit our...
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Newsletter 11: January Issue 2015
In the first days of the New Year, FSTC team is pleased to present to our wide community Issue 10 of this periodic publication. We list in this new release detailed coverage on FSTC recent activities...
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Newsletter 10: January Issue 2013
In the first days of the New Year, FSTC team is pleased to present to our wide community Issue 10 of this periodic publication. We list in this new release detailed coverage on FSTC recent activities...
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LATEST NEWSLETTERS

Newsletter 9: August Issue 2012
In the period from the last Newsletter 8, FSTC achieved new breakthroughs. New partnerships were announced...
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Newsletter 8: September Issue 2011
Over the past few months Hillary Clinton launched the 1001 Inventions exhibition in California, Jim Al-...
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Newsletter Issue 7
Find out how you could WIN a TRIP to CALIFORNIA Science Center to visit the exhibition, read about CE4CE’s...
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Newsletter Issue 6
To welcome in 2011, the Foundation for Science, Technology and Civilisation (FSTC) has chosen to give its...
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Newsletter Issue 5
A Quarterly Publication issued by the Foundation for Science, Technology and Civilisation (FSTC), Manchester...
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Newsletter Issue 4
A Quarterly Publication issued by the Foundation for Science, Technology and Civilisation (FSTC), Manchester...
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Figure 1. Ahmed Hassan Zewail 1946-2016

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Figure 2. Ibn al-Haytham's Camera Obscura. The concept of the Camera Obscuraas perceived a thousand years ago by Ibn al-Haytham, who coined the Arabic term. Note the formation of the inverted image through a ray diagram. Illustration of theCamera Obscura in 1001 Inventions: Muslim Heritage in Our World (chief editor Salim Al-Hassani), Manchester: FSTC, 2008, 2nd Edition, ISBN: 9780955242618, p. 29. See also The Year of Ibn al-Haytham (published 15/02/2011) and Ahmed H. Zewail,Micrographia of the twenty-first century: from Camera Obscura to 4D microscopy(The Royal Society, 2010).

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Figure 3. 4D electron imaging in real, Fourier and energy spaces. The conceptual design of Caltech’s UEM-2 is presented on the right; a single-electron trajectory is depicted within the UEM. The atomic-scale (femtosecond) temporal resolution characteristic of the apparatus allows for the visualization of dynamical processes in real time. Shown on the left are typical UEM frames of real-space images and diffraction patterns, together with three-dimensional maps of femtosecond-resolved electron-energy-loss spectra (FEELS). For a recent review, seeShorokhov & Zewail (2009).

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Figure 4. Microscopy time line, from camera obscura to three-dimensional electron microscopes. 4D ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction were developed a decade ago. The top inset shows the frontispiece to Hooke’s (1665) Micrographia published by the Royal Society of London. In the frontispiece to Hevelius’s Selenographia (bottom inset), Ibn al-Haytham representsRatione (the use of reason) with his geometrical proof and Galileo represents Sensu (the use of the senses) with his telescope. The two scientists hold the book’s title page between them, suggesting a harmony between the methods (Sabra 2003; Steffens 2006; Zewail & Thomas 2009).

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