World Health Day 7th April: Muslim Heritage in Medicine

World Health Day is celebrated on 7th April each year to mark the anniversary of the founding of WHO (World Health Organisation) in 1948. During Muslim civilisation, various scholars made interesting observations alongside innovative discoveries and inventions concerning healthcare. 

+ Click to read the full article
- Click to close

World Health Day is celebrated on 7th April each year to mark the anniversary of the founding of WHO (World Health Organisation) in 1948. World Health Day provides an opportunity for individuals worldwide to get involved in activities that encourage better health. Each year a theme is allocated that highlights a priority area of public health, this year’s World Health Day theme covers vector-borne diseases [1].

During Muslim civilisation, various scholars made interesting observations alongside innovative discoveries and inventions. Amongst these scholars is the celebrated al-Razi (865-925 CE) who penned the renowned treatise entitled Kitab fi Al-Judari wa Al-Hasbah, or “A Treatise on Smallpox and Measles”. This treatise was the first comprehensive text on this disease which remained popular and in great demand for over a millennium, and was also repeatedly translated into many languages.

Additional scientists include Ibn Khatimah whose findings regarding the bubonic pest, also referred to as the “Black Death”, proved striking. Speaking of the bubonic plague, Ibn Khatimah al-Ansari (1299-1369 CE), clearly described the routes of infection as through:

the ‘vapours’ that separates off from the plagued  patients,  especially what comes out through their breath at the time of the maximum corruption and sepsis in their bodies” [2]

as well as sharing other important ideas.

Please find below several articles Muslim Heritage would like to share concerning discoveries and inventions scholars from Muslim civilisation undertook regarding vector-borne disease study, prevention, restraint and cure:

 

A Medical Classic: Al-Razi’s Treatise on Smallpox and Measles

Kitab fi Al Jadari wa Al Hasaba authored by the Muslim physician Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi (d. ca. 925) is one of the books that remained popular and in great demand for over a millennium, and was also repeatedly translated into many languages.

Read more >>>

     
 

Al-Razi on Smallpox and Measles

This article by Dr. Abdulnasser Kaadan shows that as early as the 9th century, the well known Muslim physician al-Razi described, in his book Kitab al-Jadari wa 'l-Hasba (The Book on Smallpox and Measles), the symptoms of smallpox and measles.

Read more >>>

     
 

Al-Razi the Medical Scholar

Al-Razi was "a writer of rare and incredible productiveness as well as the greatest clinician of Islam." The great works of Al-Razi are of immense significance in the study of medicine.

Read more>>>

     
 

Food as Medicine in Muslim Civilization

The subject of food and diet was very essential in the Islamic Cuisine. Both of them were very important in the most of the medical manuscripts in the Ottoman world. Balanced diet was also important rule for healthy life.

Read more>>>

     
 

Highly Valued Virtues of Classical Ottoman Turkish Medical Ethics: A View From Past to Future

Virtues such as modesty, contentedness, fidelity and hopefulness expected from a physician must be perceived as general criteria of ethical standards, since principles are also the criteria for the preference of values, in a sense.

Read more>>>

     
 

Ibn Zuhr and the Progress of Surgery

This study of the original Arabic edition of the book Al-Taysir fi ‘l-Mudawat wa’l-Tadbir (Book of Simplification Concerning Therapeutics and Diet) written by the Muslim physician Ibn Zuhr (Avenzoar, 1093-1162 CE) aims...

Read more>>>

     
 

Lady Montagu and the Introduction of Smallpox Inoculation to England

The English aristocrat and writer Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762) is today remembered particularly for her letters from Turkey, an early example of a secular work by a Western woman about the Muslim Orient.

Read more>>>

     
 

Medical Sciences in the Islamic Civilization

The medical sciences and related fields have enjoyed great peaks in achievement through Muslim scholarship, which raised both standards of practice and the status of the physician. This article delves...

Read more>>>

     
 

The role of Ibn Sina (Avicenna)’s Medical Poem in the transmission of medical knowledge to medieval Europe

Were you aware that in the Medieval Islamic world, celebrated scientists such as Ibn Sina used to relay their teachings through  poetry? Poems structure and rhythm  aided the process of transmitting and memorising...

Read more>>>

     

References:

[2] Al-Khaṭṭābi M A. Ibn Khātmah al-Anṣārī  wa Kitābuhu fī Waṣf Wabā’ al-Ṭāʿūn (Ibn Khātmah al-Anṣārī   and his Book on the Plague Epidemic). In: Al-Ṭibb wa al-Aṭibbā’ Fī al-Andalus al- Islāmiyyah: Dirāsah wa Tarājim wa Nuṣūṣ (Medicine and Physicians in Islamic Andalus: A Study, Biographies and Texts). Al-Khaṭṭābi M A (Editor). Beirut: Dar Al-Gharb Al-Islāmī. First Edition. Volume II,  p  161-180

Rate this article: 
Average: 5 (2 votes)
See full gallery