FEATURED ARTICLES

The Courtyard Houses of Syria
The courtyard house is one of the most enduring architectural forms, transcending regional, historical and cultural boundaries. Its balance of simple appropriate construction, environmental control...
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Aleppo Citadel: Glimpses of the Past
The Citadel of Aleppo is one of the oldest monuments in the world. It is the most famous historic architectural site in Syria and is built on top of a huge, partially artificial mound rising 50m...
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The Fate of Manuscripts in Iraq and Elsewhere
In this well informed article, Dr Geoffrey Roper, an expert in the field, outlines an impressive portrait of the dangers and threats encountered by the national heritage of Iraq due to the dramatic...
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1001 Inventions launches Rotterdam Exhibition
Award-winning show about the scientific achievements of Muslim Civilisation now launched
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Ibn Khaldun: Studies on His Contribution in Economy
In the following section, we focus on Ibn Khaldun's contribution to economic thought. We publish contributions by recognized scholars who endeavoured recently to give Ibn Khaldun long overdue credit...
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CE4tF at the British Science Festival 2015
CE4tF will be hosting an event at this year’s British Science Festival in Birmingham.
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Gaza at the Crossroad of Civilisations: Two Contemporary Views
Gaza, this tormented part of Palestine, land of suffering and resistance, is also a land of long history. This article presents two recent attempts to recover the ancient and medieval history of Gaza...
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Medicine and Health in Medieval Arabic Poetry: An Historical Review
This review of medieval Arabic medical poetry is based on our study of the two major classical biographical encyclopedias: “Uyoon Al Anbaa Fi Tabaqaat Al Atibbaa” ("Essential Information on the...
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Women Dealing with Health during the Ottoman Reign
In the history of Islamic civilization, many hospitals were founded by women, either as wives, daughters or mothers of sultans. All health personnel were male at these hospitals. In the Ottoman...
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Daily Sabah: A woman with a past
Taken from www.dailysabah.com/features/2014/07/12/a-woman-with-a-past: Fatima al-Fihri, a Muslim woman activist from the annals of history has been reintroduced to inspire future generations.
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The role of Ibn Sina (Avicenna)’s Medical Poem in the transmission of medical knowledge to medieval Europe
Were you aware that in the Medieval Islamic world, celebrated scientists such as Ibn Sina used to relay their teachings through  poetry? Poems structure and rhythm  aided the process of...
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Ottoman Music Therapy
Music has been used as a mean of therapy through the centuries to counter all kinds of disorders by various peoples. Physicians and musicians in the Ottoman civilization were aware of the music...
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RECENT ARTICLES

Figure 1. Horseshoe arches, Ummayad Mosque in Damascus.
The Horseshoe and Transverse Arches
The first Muslim adaptation and modification of the design of the arch occurred in the invention of the...
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'Arabick Roots' of science and medicine exhibition
Sheikha Mozah and FSTC at Royal launch in London
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Al-Kindi, Cryptography, Code Breaking and Ciphers
Cryptography paved the way for the development of arguably humanity's greatest achievements yet, Computers,...
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PICTURE GALLERIES

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Figure 2: Front cover of Al-Duktūr Ahmad Salīm Sa‘īdān: Mukhtārāt min intājihi al-fikrī, selected and introduced by Khālid Ahmad Jarrār (Amman, 2002).
Figure 3: A page from a 13th-century Arabic recension (tahrīr) of Euclid's Elements by Nasīr al-Dīn al-Tūsī. © Edinburgh University Library. (Source).
Figure 4: A page from Kitāb al-jabr wa l-muqābala, the first extant algebra text, written in about 825 by Muhammad ibn Mūsā al-Khwārizmī. (Source).
Figure 5: Page from a manuscript of the Algebra (Maqālah fi al-jabr wa-al muqābalah) of ‘Umar Al-Khayyām (1048-1131). Manuscript on paper, 56 leaves, 13th century. Columbia University Libraries, RBML, Smith Oriental MS 45. (Source).
Figure 6: Page from Al-Kitāb al-Fakhrī [the Fakhri book] of the mathematician Al-Karajī (d. 1029) in which he presented geometric demonstrations of an equation. (Source).
Figure 7: Front cover of Muqaddima li-tārīkh al-fikr al-‘ilmī fī al-islām (Introduction to the history of scientific thought in Islam) by Ahmad Salīm Sa‘īdān (Kuwait, 1988, ‘Ālam al-ma‘rifa, No. 131).
Figure 8: Page from a Latin version of Euclid's Elements, Liber elementorum in artem geometria (Venice, 1482). This Latin version is thought to have been translated from Arabic by the English scholar Adelard of Bath (12th century), with a commentary by Campanus of Novara. (Source).
Figure 9: Nasīr al-Dīn al-Tūsī's (d. 1274 CE) record of Euclid's proof of the Pythagorean Theorem. (Source).
Figure 10: Extract from an Arabic mathematical text on the concept of the decimal fractions, which is attributed to Stevin (around 1600), whilst the existence of such fractions in Arabic mathematical works is attested as early as the 10th century. (Source). See: Seeking Science from the Lands of Islam by George Saliba.
Figure 2: Ibn Sina drawing by A. Suheyl Unver (Source).
Figure 3: A class at the Gazanfer Aga Madrasa founded in 1566 (image from Divan-i Nadiri, Topkapi Palace Museum Library, H. 899) (Source).
Figure 4: Page from the oldest copy of the second volume of The Canon Of Medicine by Ibn Sina, preserved in The Institute of Manuscripts of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences; part of Memory of the World Project sponsored by the UNESCO (Source).
Figure 5: Front cover of Ibn Sina, Avicenne: la vie & l'œuvre by Sleim Ammar (Tunis: L'or du temps, 1998) (Source).
Figure 6: Page from an illuminated manuscript of the Latin translation of the Canon of Medicine by Ibn Sina (Source).
Figure 7: Commemorative medal issued by the UNESCO in 1980 to mark the 1000th birth anniversary of Ibn Sina. The obverse depicts a scene showing Avicenna surrounded by his disciples, inspired by a miniature in a 17th-century Turkish manuscript; whilst on the reverse is a phrase by Avicenna in Arabic and Latin: "Cooperate for the well-being of the body and the survival of the human species" (Source). The UNESCO established the Avicenna Prize for Ethics in Science in 2002 (see brochure: Avicenna and the ethics of science and technology today, UNESCO, 2004).
Figure 8: Madrasat al-'Attarin (Attarin school) in Fez, Morocco, a classical school built in 1350-55 CE by the Merinid Sultan Abu ‘Inan (Source).
Figure 2: Vaginal speculum, 2 types of forceps and double-edged scalpel (suspended). From a 1271 Arabic copy of al-Zahrawi's Surgery, written in the 10th century. Bodleian Library, University of Oxford, MS Marsh 54, fol. 68v. © Bodleian Library, University of Oxford, 2007.
Figure 3: Vaginal speculum. From a 14th-century Latin copy of al-Zahrawi's Surgery. British Library, Add. MS 36617, fol. 28v. © British Library. Permission for the publication of this photo was allowed to the authors by The British Library.

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