FEATURED ARTICLES

The Scientific Center of Kuwait to Host 1001 Inventions in 2015
The Scientific Center of Kuwait announces the February 2015 opening of the award-winning 1001 Inventions Exhibition
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UNESCO Announces 1001 Inventions Partnership
1000 Years of Arabic Optics to be a focus of the United Nations proclaimed 'International Year of Light' in 2015.
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Special Session Announcement: “Science and Innovation during Muslim Civilization and how to present them in Schools and Public Domain", Sharjah, 8-11 Dec 2014. In collaboration with FSTC (UK).
Special Session Announcement “Science and Innovation during Muslim Civilization and how to present them in Schools and Public Domain" Session Code: SS3 Dec 10th, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. As part of:...
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BSA presents prestigious award to Dr Anne-Maria Brennan
The British Science Association (BSA) awarded Dr Anne-Maria Brennan with the Sir Walter Bodmer Award. Dr Anne-Maria Brennan is board member of FSTC and Chairperson of CE4tF.
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The Transfer of Science Between India, Europe and China via Muslim Heritage
[Proceedings of the conference 1001 Inventions: Muslim Heritage in Our World organised by FSTC, London, 25-26 May 2010]. The Islamic realms served as a crucible for scientific learning from the...
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Black History Month: African contributions to Muslim Civilisation
From the grand University of Sankore, Timbuktu to mathematics and architecture in North Africa, the African contribution within Muslim civilisation is invaluable. As October marks Black History Month...
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1001 Inventions' Science Show and Schools Programme launches in Sao Paulo, Brazil
Tuesday 23rd September 2014, Sao Paulo: A new theatrical science show and educational programme was launched today at the Institute of Butantan. The ‘1001 Inventions Brazil Schools...
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The Courtyard Houses of Syria
The courtyard house is one of the most enduring architectural forms, transcending regional, historical and cultural boundaries. Its balance of simple appropriate construction, environmental control...
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Aleppo Citadel: Glimpses of the Past
The Citadel of Aleppo is one of the oldest monuments in the world. It is the most famous historic architectural site in Syria and is built on top of a huge, partially artificial mound rising 50m...
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The Fate of Manuscripts in Iraq and Elsewhere
In this well informed article, Dr Geoffrey Roper, an expert in the field, outlines an impressive portrait of the dangers and threats encountered by the national heritage of Iraq due to the dramatic...
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1001 Inventions launches Rotterdam Exhibition
Award-winning show about the scientific achievements of Muslim Civilisation now launched
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Ibn Khaldun: Studies on His Contribution in Economy
In the following section, we focus on Ibn Khaldun's contribution to economic thought. We publish contributions by recognized scholars who endeavoured recently to give Ibn Khaldun long overdue credit...
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RECENT ARTICLES

The Globalisation of Crops
As the Muslims advanced, they introduced methods and machinery of the Ancient Near East, and also certain...
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Figure 1. Horseshoe arches, Ummayad Mosque in Damascus.
The Horseshoe and Transverse Arches
The first Muslim adaptation and modification of the design of the arch occurred in the invention of the...
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(Source for OBE Medal image)
Queen Honours the FSTC Chairman, Professor Mohamed El-Gomati
Professor Mohamed El-Gomati, recently appointed Chairman of the Foundation for Science Technology and...
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Al-Khawarizmi (780 - 850 CE)
Algebra, algorithm, quadratic equation, sine function... just some of the terms which would not be known to...
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PICTURE GALLERIES

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Figure 2: A shuttle aerial view of Palestine (Source).
Figure 3: Map showing Palestine's topography (Source).
Figure 4: View from Gaza City (Source).
Figure 5: Front cover of Life at the Crossroads: A History of Gaza by Gerald Butt (Rimal Publications, 1995).
Figure 6: The Great Mosque of Gaza, also known as the Great 'Umari Mosque (Al-Jami'a al-'Umari al-Kabir), is the largest and oldest mosque in the Gaza Strip (Source).
Figure 7: Coptic Church in Gaza City Suburbs (Source).
Figure 8: Views from Napoleon's Fort (Qasr El-Basha) located in downtown Gaza, an imposing stone building dating back to the Mamluk period. Napoleon is believed to have spent a few nights in it on his way through the town in 1799 (Source).
Figure 9: Four objects illustrating the ancient history of Gaza: a. dagger handle with incised geometric decorations, Early Bronze Age, 2700-2350 BCE (bone, length 19.5 cm); b. Egyptian scarab, Iron Age or Second Intermediate Period (enamelled steatite, length 1.4 cm, width 1 cm, thickness 0.6 cm); c. figurine: woman with drum, Iron Age, 8th-7th century BCE (ceramic, height 10 cm, width 5.2 cm, depth 5.2 cm); d. figurine: head with pointed hat (probably a horseman), Persian, 6th-5th century BCE (hand-modelled ceramic, height 3.2 cm, width 3 cm). © Antiquities Department of Gaza (Source).
Figure 10: Archaeological vestiges from Gaza ancient history: a. Aphrodite or Hecate with infant Pan, Hellenistic or Roman (marble, height 48 cm); b. bottle (alabaster), Low Period, 4th-3rd century BCE (calcite, height 14.5 cm); c. spherical phial, Roman, 1st century CE (glass, 6 x 4cm); d. Anthropomorphic jar, Roman, 1st-2nd century CE (glass, height 9cm, width 4.5 cm). © Jawdat Khoudary Collection, Gaza (Source).
Figure 11: Islamic objects from Gaza: a. Oil lamp decorated with arabesques, Umayyad, 7th-8th century (ceramic, 8.5 x 6.5 cm, height 4 cm); b. funerary stele with Arabic inscriptions, Ayyubid, 12th-13th century (white marble, height 39 cm, width 33 cm, thickness 5.5 cm); c. decorative plate with palm tree motif, Mameluk (limestone, height 33 cm, width 26 cm, thickness 10 cm); d. half dirham, Bahri Mameluks, Al-Mansour Nour al-Dîn 'Ali, Cairo, 1257-1259 (silver, 2.047 g). © Department of Antiquities, Gaza and Jawdat Khoudary Collection, Gaza (Source).
Figure 12: Front cover of the catalogue of the exhibition Gaza at the Crossroad of Civilizations: Gaza à la croisée des civilisations. 1. Contexte archéologique et historique, edited by M.-A. Haldimann et al. (Neuchâtel: Chaman Edition, 2007).
Figure 2: Front cover of Al-Duktūr Ahmad Salīm Sa‘īdān: Mukhtārāt min intājihi al-fikrī, selected and introduced by Khālid Ahmad Jarrār (Amman, 2002).
Figure 3: A page from a 13th-century Arabic recension (tahrīr) of Euclid's Elements by Nasīr al-Dīn al-Tūsī. © Edinburgh University Library. (Source).
Figure 4: A page from Kitāb al-jabr wa l-muqābala, the first extant algebra text, written in about 825 by Muhammad ibn Mūsā al-Khwārizmī. (Source).
Figure 5: Page from a manuscript of the Algebra (Maqālah fi al-jabr wa-al muqābalah) of ‘Umar Al-Khayyām (1048-1131). Manuscript on paper, 56 leaves, 13th century. Columbia University Libraries, RBML, Smith Oriental MS 45. (Source).
Figure 6: Page from Al-Kitāb al-Fakhrī [the Fakhri book] of the mathematician Al-Karajī (d. 1029) in which he presented geometric demonstrations of an equation. (Source).
Figure 7: Front cover of Muqaddima li-tārīkh al-fikr al-‘ilmī fī al-islām (Introduction to the history of scientific thought in Islam) by Ahmad Salīm Sa‘īdān (Kuwait, 1988, ‘Ālam al-ma‘rifa, No. 131).
Figure 8: Page from a Latin version of Euclid's Elements, Liber elementorum in artem geometria (Venice, 1482). This Latin version is thought to have been translated from Arabic by the English scholar Adelard of Bath (12th century), with a commentary by Campanus of Novara. (Source).
Figure 9: Nasīr al-Dīn al-Tūsī's (d. 1274 CE) record of Euclid's proof of the Pythagorean Theorem. (Source).
Figure 10: Extract from an Arabic mathematical text on the concept of the decimal fractions, which is attributed to Stevin (around 1600), whilst the existence of such fractions in Arabic mathematical works is attested as early as the 10th century. (Source). See: Seeking Science from the Lands of Islam by George Saliba.
Figure 2: Ibn Sina drawing by A. Suheyl Unver (Source).
Figure 3: A class at the Gazanfer Aga Madrasa founded in 1566 (image from Divan-i Nadiri, Topkapi Palace Museum Library, H. 899) (Source).
Figure 4: Page from the oldest copy of the second volume of The Canon Of Medicine by Ibn Sina, preserved in The Institute of Manuscripts of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences; part of Memory of the World Project sponsored by the UNESCO (Source).
Figure 5: Front cover of Ibn Sina, Avicenne: la vie & l'œuvre by Sleim Ammar (Tunis: L'or du temps, 1998) (Source).
Figure 6: Page from an illuminated manuscript of the Latin translation of the Canon of Medicine by Ibn Sina (Source).
Figure 7: Commemorative medal issued by the UNESCO in 1980 to mark the 1000th birth anniversary of Ibn Sina. The obverse depicts a scene showing Avicenna surrounded by his disciples, inspired by a miniature in a 17th-century Turkish manuscript; whilst on the reverse is a phrase by Avicenna in Arabic and Latin: "Cooperate for the well-being of the body and the survival of the human species" (Source). The UNESCO established the Avicenna Prize for Ethics in Science in 2002 (see brochure: Avicenna and the ethics of science and technology today, UNESCO, 2004).
Figure 8: Madrasat al-'Attarin (Attarin school) in Fez, Morocco, a classical school built in 1350-55 CE by the Merinid Sultan Abu ‘Inan (Source).

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