FEATURED ARTICLES

Ode to Ahmad Baba Al-Massufi
Abu al-Abbas Ahmad ibn Ahmad al-Takruri Al-Massufi al-Timbukti, otherwise commonly known as Ahmad Baba for short, was a well-known teacher, professor, philosopher, Arabic grammarian and an author of...
LEARN MORE
Cairo University Announces Partnership with 1001 Inventions
Cairo University joins 1001 Inventions partners in Egypt 
LEARN MORE
World Fairtrade Day
Happy World Fair Trade Day!
LEARN MORE
Professor Devin Stewart: The Fihrist of Ibn al-Nadīm and the Transmission of Knowledge in the Islamic World
On Wednesday 22nd April, a public lecture exploring “The Fihrist of Ibn al-Nadeem and the Transmission of Knowledge in the Islamic World” was presented by Professor Devin Stewart at the Al-Furqan...
LEARN MORE
Ibn Yunus and The Pendulum: A History of Errors
In this article, Professor David A. King explores the authenticity of the statement that tenth-century Egyptian astronomer Ibn Yūnus was the first person to use a pendulum to measure time. After...
LEARN MORE
1001 Inventions Bahrain Exhibition
Blockbuster exhibition will be anchor attraction at ‘Zidni Ilman’
LEARN MORE
On 23 April the World Celebrates the Book
World Book Day or World Book and Copyright Day is a yearly event on 23 April, organized by UNESCO to promote reading, publishing and copyright. On this occasion, we are pleased to invite visitors and...
LEARN MORE
Earth Day
Muslim Heritage is very happy to announce that today, 22nd April, is Earth Day. Earth Day is a day of events and observances intended to inspire awareness of and appreciation for the Earth's...
LEARN MORE
An Obituary: Professor Rabie El-Said Abdel-Halim
We have just received the sad news of the passing of Professor Rabie El-Said Abdel-Halim. He passed away in his sleep this morning 15th April 2015 Wednesday. May he rest in peace, and may his family...
LEARN MORE
Ibn Sina's The Canon of Medicine
The Sheikh al-Ra'is Sharaf al-Mulk Abu ‘Ali al-Husayn b. ‘Abd Allah b. al-Hasan b. ‘Ali Ibn Sina, in Latin he is know as Avicenna and his most famous works are those on philosophy and medicine....
LEARN MORE
Slovenian Prime Minister Launches 1001 Inventions In Ljubljana
VIP Audience Celebrates Central European Premiere of Muslim Heritage Exhibition
LEARN MORE
World Health Day 7th April: Muslim Heritage in Medicine
World Health Day is celebrated on 7th April each year to mark the anniversary of the founding of WHO (World Health Organisation) in 1948. During Muslim civilisation, various scholars made interesting...
LEARN MORE

RECENT ARTICLES

Pages

Pages

Pages

PICTURE GALLERIES

Pages

Dish with epigraphic decoration at the Louvre Museum in Paris. The Kufic inscription reads: "Science has first a bitter taste, but at the end it tastes sweeter than honey. Good health [to the owner." Terracotta, white slip ground and slip underglaze decoration, Khurasan (Iran), 11th–12th century. Lusterware was first developed in Iraq in the 9th century and was imitated and prized by the Fatimid rulers in Egypt starting in the mid-10th century before spreading to Syria, Anatolia and ultimately Iran. (Image in the public domain).
Original drawings of the five water raising machines designed and described by al-Jazari in his treatise of mechanics. Respectivey: (a) a machine for raising water from a pool to a higher place by an animal who turns a lever-arm; (b) a machine for raising water from a pool or a well by an animal who rotates it; (c) a machine for raising water by means of an endless chain of pots; (d) a machine for raising water from a pool by means of flumed swape operated by a cranck driven by an animl through gears; (d) pump driven by a water wheelell by an animal who rotates it. Source: Al-Jazari, Kitab ma'rifat al-hiyal al-handasiya, Istanbul, Suleymaniye Library, MS 3472: online version.
Two views of the famous six-cylinder pump described by Taqi al-Din Ibn Ma'ruf: Manuscript view (Taqi al-Din, Al-Turuq al-Saniya fi al-'ālat al-rūhaniya, Chester Beatty Library in Dublin, MS 5232); and drawings of the virtual reconstruction of the pump. Source: S. Al-Hassani The Machines of Al-Iazari and Taqi Al-Din; S. Al-Hassani and M. A. Al-Lawati, The Six-Cylinder Water Pump of Taqi al-Din: Its Mathematics, Operation and Virtual Design. Click here and here to view animations of the device.
Two metalworks from classical Islamic times: Incense burner made for Sultan Qala'un (reigned 1294-1340) [Egypt or Syria, 1294-1340; beaten brass, inlaid with gold, silver, and a black compound]; and a large canteen, the only known example of its kind from the Islamic world; it recalls the shape of ceramic pilgrim flasks. Its inlaid silver decoration combines different styles of calligraphy and decorative motifs, such as intricate geometric designs, and lively animal scrolls [Syria, mid-13th century, Brass, silver inlay]. © The Smithsonian Institution, Washington. (Source).
Two folio pages (239b - 241b ) of the manuscript Or. 298 at Leiden University Library, which is probably the oldest known Arabic manuscript on paper (dated Dhu al-Qa`da 252 (866 CE). Arabic, paper, 241 ff., upright script (with application of ihmal), bound in a full-leather standard binding. The present volume contains an incomplete copy of Gharib al-Hadith, by Abu `Ubayd al-Qasim b. Sallam al-Baghdadi (d. 223 H/837 CE). (Source).
Front cover of Arab Seafaring in the Indian Ocean in Ancient and Early Medieval Times by George F. Hourani (Princeton University Press, 1995, Paperback, Expanded Edition).
The construction of castle Khavarnaq in Hirat, painted by Bihzad (ca. 1494-1495). (British Museum, London) (Source: The Yorck Proiect: 10.000 Meisterwerke der Malerei. DVD-ROM, 2002, DirectMedia GMBH).
The construction of the Masiid-i Iami in Samarkand, attributed to Behzad (ca.1485,). © Iohn Work Garrett, Library, Iohns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA. (Source).
Illustration depicting an Islamic ship from a 13th century manuscript of Maqamat al-Hariri (Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, MS Arabe 5847). (Source).
Four samples of Moorish Cuenca tiles, Portuguese Azuleio from Portugal, inspired from ancient Islamic designs. Handmade Molded Clay Ceramic tile (140mm x 140mm x 10mm) BT 5671 Spanish Moorish tiles Islamic Moroccan tile. (Source).
Goblet, 9th century, probably from Egypt, transparent pale greenish blue glass, blown from two gathers and scratch-engraved (height 11.9 cm, diameter 9.2 cm). Inscription (in kufic script): "Blessings from Allah to the owner of the goblet. Drink!". Formulas including good wishes were commonly found on eating and drinking vessels in both pottery and glass. (Source).
Window in stained glass, 17th century, Egypt or Syria (38.7 x 48.3 cm). A window such as this with brightly colored panes in blue, orange, green, and red might have been found in a room of an aristocratic home in the Islamic world. Tinted glass was favored because it filtered the light, but it also complemented the multihued furnishings of the room. (Source).
Two views of antique Damascus swords. Research on Damascus steel revealed the use of a proto concept of nanotechnology. (Source 1 – Source 2).
Two Islamic knifes (khaniar) made of Damascus steel, wih a view on the detail of their surface. So-called Damascus steel swords were known from around the seventh century onward and dominated warfare for centuries as a result of their good toughness in combination with their outstanding cutting ability. The name derives from the fact that these swords were first encountered by Europeans in Damascus. Damascus steel swords are still regarded in this manner as evidenced by continuing efforts up to the present time to determine the methodology used to produce the swords. (Source).
Analysis of the nanotube structure of Damascus steel. The swords forged in Damascushad a surface pattern of moiré ripples, which resemble turbulent water, with a wavy pattern on its surface which looks like wood grain. Details: (a). A Damascus sword; (b). the wavy pattern in the sword; (c-d). the nanowire structure of the steel in the blade. (Source: C. Srinivasan, Damascus Sword - An Ancient Product of Nanotechnology).
Researcher Asli Sancar holding her book. (Source).
Rogier, Drapers in the Grand Bazaar. Source: Ottoman Women - Myth and Reality.
Liotard, Turkish Woman in the bath. Source: Ottoman Women - Myth and Reality.
Lewis, In the Bey's Garden. Source: Ottoman Women - Myth and Reality.
Twin pavilions, Topkapi Palace. Source: Ottoman Women - Myth and Reality.
Wilkie, Mrs. Young. Source: Ottoman Women - Myth and Reality.
Portrait of Hurrem Sultan. Source: Ottoman Women - Myth and Reality.
Poster of the conference held in Ankara.
Dinner in Ankara to welcome FSTC's participation at the Kâtip Çelebi conference. From left: Prof. Salim Al-Hassani, Prof. Ahmed Rumeli (Middle East University), the "1001" inscribed on a large slice of Turkish bread, Prof. Ralph Salmi (California State University), Tuba Urcu (office manager to Prof. Karliga and interpreter), and Prof. Bekir Karliga (Bahcesehir University).
Professor Salim Al-Hassani presenting his lecture before the conference. (Source).
Dr Salim Ayduz during his lecture. (Source).
An 18th-century copy of the Cihan-numa, a manual on geography of the earth by Kâtip Çelebi, preserved in the Leiden University Library (MS Or. 12.363). (Source).
Illustrations from one of Kâtip Çelebi's books.

Pages